Calgary’s fringe suburbs under construction: In pictures

Posted: 06/09/2013 in FLOO-G Snaps (Pictures)
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Fringe suburbia.

Outward growth.

Urban sprawl.

I’m sure everyone has a reaction when they read any of those words.

Now that I have your attention, this isn’t an urban vs. suburban post (and sorry if that disappoints you) but my own sort-of insider’s look into the fringes as they’re being made.

One of my livings is building Calgary’s fringe suburbia in residential construction, so every day I get a front-row seat on new communities being built in action and it can sometimes be interesting to document visually.

I have friends who have always lived in the inner city. The reason I whip out my cell phone and snap photos at work sometimes is that it’s my own way of trying to show them the scale of outward growth — or just when the sunrise is amazing.

I’ll guide you through five of them I’ve taken over the last year. These are just small snapshots of working and living on the edge.

This October sunrise almost makes this street in Mahogany seem its' been set ablaze. Note the different phases of finishing the houses are at. Framing is incomplete on one, siding's not installed on some and some do have their siding finished.

This October sunrise almost makes this street in Mahogany in the southeast seem it’s been set ablaze. Note the different phases of the houses from foundation digging, framing, roofing and siding.

When both concrete mixer and pump trucks come in to pour a foundation, an already busy residential street full of construction vehicles can become a full-blown traffic circus. Note that some of these houses are finished and lived in, but the driveways and/or landscaping isn't finished yet. In case you're wondering, no, construction workers aren't allowed to block driveways of lived-in homes. This was taken in Castle Keep in Aspen Estates in April. Castle Keep, akin to its name, follows somewhat of a medieval-inspired architecture with these luxury houses' stone and stucco exteriors. There's a figure of a knight at the subdivision's entrance too.

When both concrete mixer and pump trucks come in to pour a foundation, an already busy residential street full of construction vehicles can become a full-blown traffic circus. Note that some of these houses are finished and lived in, but the driveways and/or landscaping may not be finished yet. In case you’re wondering, no, construction workers aren’t allowed to block driveways of lived-in homes. This was taken in Castle Keep in Aspen Estates in the southwest sometime in April. Castle Keep, akin to its name, follows somewhat of a medieval-inspired architecture with these luxury houses’ stone and stucco exteriors. There’s a figure of a knight at the subdivision’s entrance too.

Earth movers in action. This was taken around last month on the very northern edge of Evanston in the northwest. I'm not sure what's going to be built here, but my best guess is more houses.

Earth movers in action. This was taken around last month on the very northern edge of Evanston in the northwest. I’m not sure what’s going to be built here, but my best guess is, well, more houses.

OK, this one's not Calgary, but this street in Sunset Ridge in Cochrane I took today gives you a pretty good example of what a street that fairly close to completion looks like. The lived-in homes seem to outnumber the ones under construction. Not to mention the view and the perfect blue sky is spectacular.

OK, this one’s not Calgary, but this street in Sunset Ridge in Cochrane I took today gives you a pretty good example of what a street that’s fairly close to completion looks like. The lived-in homes seem to outnumber the ones under construction. Not to mention the view and the perfect blue sky is spectacular.

Aspen Estates, again, in this photo also taken today, as I stood on an empty lot. Note the rows of houses on the left and the earth movers on the right. Probably two more years and this photo would have a lot more houses in the frame.

Aspen Estates again in this photo, also taken today, as I stood on an empty lot. Note the rows of houses on the left, looking generally finished with completed siding, trees and everything. Then there’s the barren earth on the right. Probably two more years and this photo will have a lot more houses in the frame. Problem is if I came to this spot again in the future, a house on the lot I stood in would be blocking the view. Maybe the future resident will let me use his/her backyard for a moment?

Also see: Part 2 of this photo series.

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