Posts Tagged ‘Mahogany’

Fall makes for a pretty good time to get some nice sunrise shots of Calgary and area’s new ‘burbs, as people inside all of those houses are on the cusp of getting ready for the day, opening their curtains greeting the morning sky… and the incoming construction noise and traffic.

Thanks to those of you who have taken a genuine interest in my insider’s look at outward growth as it happens and enjoyed my previous entries in this series.

If you’ve missed them, here are entries one and two.

This newest collection was taken over the course of late summer and early fall.

Rural meets suburban on the edge of Silverado in the southwest as acreage properties loom beyond the lots where luxury homes will soon be built.

Rural meets suburban on the edge of Silverado in the southwest as acreage properties loom beyond the lots where luxury homes will soon be built.

Welcome to Redstone, Skyview Ranch's neighbouring subdivision in the northeast. Parent walks child to (presumably) the school bus stop in a mainly-finished street. Pardon the pixelation; this was shot with night setting.

Welcome to Redstone, Skyview Ranch’s neighbouring community in the northeast. Parent walks child to (presumably) the school bus stop in a mainly-finished street. Pardon the pixelation; this was shot with night setting.

The moon sets in the southeast community of Mahogany on a row of lived-in houses still landing for their landscaping to be done and their garages built. At least Canada Post seems quick to keep up, though.

The moon sets in the southeast community of Mahogany on a row of lived-in houses still waiting for their landscaping to be done and their garages built. At least Canada Post seems quick to keep up, though.

Ummm... does building on a hill count as upward growth? Earth movers at work in our fastest-growing community of Evanston in the northwest.

Ummm… does building on a hill count as upward growth? Earth movers at work in our fastest-growing community of Evanston in the northwest.

A fleet of parked earth movers, likely due to servicing rest in Mahogany with the South Health Campus looming nearby.

Two earth movers drive to their destination while a fleet is parked beyond, likely due to servicing, in Mahogany as the South Health Campus looms nearby.

Auburn Bay in the southeast can serve as a good example of how challenging it can be to make out the downtown skyline from so far away. You may need to squint...

Auburn Bay in the southeast can serve as a good example of how challenging it can be to make out the downtown skyline in a cell phone picture from so far away. You may need to squint…

Another said example.

Another said example…

...But it's not hard to make out the lovely reflections in the water on a calm morning at Auburn Bay's lake.

…But it’s not hard to make out the lovely reflections in the water on a calm morning at Auburn Bay’s lake.

According to this panel of Pink Wood installed on a house's side at Ranchers' Rise in Okotoks, it's, well... Pink Wood, a type that's treated to help reduce flame spread in event of a fire, as well as help with mildew resistance.

According to this panel of Pink Wood installed on a house’s side at Ranchers’ Rise in Okotoks, it’s, well… Pink Wood, a type that’s treated to help reduce flame spread in event of a fire, as well as help with mildew resistance.

Good morning, Langdon.

Good morning, Langdon.

 

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In my first post on this subject, I explained that I help build our fringe suburbs as a drywaller and snap photos for people who’ve always lived in the inner city to show them the scale of what goes on in our fringes.

Calgary, as you well know, is a city that’s always under construction — so much so that it has an informal title of being the construction capital of Canada.

Love it or hate it, just for the scale of all these houses being built all around us alone, our outward growth as it happens could almost be considered a Wonder of the World.

Here are eight more snapshots that I’ve taken in Calgary and surrounding communities.

Bust out the soccer ball, kids. This greenspace in Mahogany looks fairly recently landscaped. Note some houses in the background are still in the framing phase, so residents of that street will still have to bear with construction vehicles for a while.

Bust out the soccer ball, kids. This greenspace in Mahogany in the southeast looks fairly recently landscaped. Note some houses in the background are still in the framing phase, so residents of that street will still have to bear with construction vehicles for a while.

On the other hand, unless the kids get permission to play in the dirt, this street in Auburn Bay, alos in the southeast, will have to wait for their greenspace still. The street here looks 100 per cent complete with both semi-detached and single-family homes, with the South Health Campus looming overhead.

On the other hand, unless the kids get permission to play in the dirt, this street in Auburn Bay, also in the southeast, will still have to wait for their greenspace. The street here looks 100 per cent complete with both semi-detached and single-family homes, with the South Health Campus looming behind.

Speaking of playing in the dirt, one concern about living in fringe suburbia is teaching kids the importance of safety. I've seen instances of children playing in construction zones or even climbing in waste bins. I forgot which neighbourhood this was, but it seemed strange that the backyard of this lived-in house adjacent to lot foundations yet to be dug was not totally fenced off, so I snapped this.

Speaking of playing in the dirt, one concern about living in fringe suburbia is teaching kids the importance of safety. I’ve seen instances of children playing in construction zones or even climbing in waste bins. I forgot which neighbourhood this was, but it seemed strange that the backyard of this lived-in house adjacent to lot foundations yet to be dug was not totally fenced off, so I snapped this.

Just because a house's possession date has been met and the buyers have moved and settled in doesn't mean that all the work is 100 per cent finished. Generally, presumably because the backlog of work is so huge, it might be a year or maybe two before one's yard is landscaped. This patio furniture sitting atop a deck surrounded by dirt and earth piles demonstrates this fact. These residents' lawnmower will probably have a very fine layer of dust to wipe off by the time they can bust it out of the garage for the first time.

Just because a house’s possession date has been met and the buyers have moved and settled in doesn’t mean that all the work is 100 per cent finished. Generally, presumably because the backlog of work is so huge, it might be a year or maybe two before one’s yard is landscaped. This patio furniture sitting atop a deck surrounded by dirt, construction debris and earth piles demonstrates this fact. If they have one, these residents’ lawnmower will probably have a very fine layer of dust to wipe off by the time they can bust it out of the garage for the first time.

Depending on where you are in Nolan Hill in the northeast, you can get a view of the actual literal fringe of the city. In this snapshot, suburban meets rural with both single-family homes, mid-right, and acreage properties (you might have to squint) in the background in the upper left, captured in the same frame.

Depending on where you are in Nolan Hill in the northeast, you can get a view of the actual literal fringe of the city. In this snapshot, suburban meets rural with both single-family homes, mid-right, and acreage properties (you might have to squint) in the background in the upper left, captured in the same frame.

The near-complete house on the upper-right looks a little lonely. It'll be a while before it's surrounded by more homes. I forgot where i snapped this, but it was somewhere in the southeast.

The near-complete house on the upper-right looks a little lonely. It’ll be a while before it’s surrounded by more homes. I forgot where I snapped this, but it was somewhere in the southeast.

Please slow down: Construction workers by be bouncing a basketball on their break. It's generally uncommon for all street signs to be installed on streets that are still, for most part, a construction zone. This was taken in Sunset Ridge in Cochrane.

Please slow down: Construction workers may be bouncing a basketball on their break. It’s generally uncommon for all street signs to be installed on streets that are still, for most part, a construction zone. This was taken in Sunset Ridge in Cochrane.

Got money? This is a property being built in the wealthy acreage community of Morgans Rise in Springbank. Between it, Mystic Ridge, Blueridge Estates, Lynx Ridge, Stone Pine and others I've probably missed, we have a lot of very wealthy people living next door to us in country estate communities just a five- to -ten-minute drive past our city limits in places like Springbank and Bearspaw. To the south of us, there's also De Winton and Heritage Pointe.

Got money? This is a property being built in the wealthy acreage community of Morgans Rise in Springbank. Between it, Mystic Ridge, Blueridge Estates, Lynx Ridge, StonePine and others I’ve probably missed, we have a lot of very wealthy people living next door to us in country estate communities (some of them gated) just a five- to ten-minute drive past our city limits in places like Springbank and Bearspaw. To the south of us, there’s also De Winton and Heritage Pointe.

Fringe suburbia.

Outward growth.

Urban sprawl.

I’m sure everyone has a reaction when they read any of those words.

Now that I have your attention, this isn’t an urban vs. suburban post (and sorry if that disappoints you) but my own sort-of insider’s look into the fringes as they’re being made.

One of my livings is building Calgary’s fringe suburbia in residential construction, so every day I get a front-row seat on new communities being built in action and it can sometimes be interesting to document visually.

I have friends who have always lived in the inner city. The reason I whip out my cell phone and snap photos at work sometimes is that it’s my own way of trying to show them the scale of outward growth — or just when the sunrise is amazing.

I’ll guide you through five of them I’ve taken over the last year. These are just small snapshots of working and living on the edge.

This October sunrise almost makes this street in Mahogany seem its' been set ablaze. Note the different phases of finishing the houses are at. Framing is incomplete on one, siding's not installed on some and some do have their siding finished.

This October sunrise almost makes this street in Mahogany in the southeast seem it’s been set ablaze. Note the different phases of the houses from foundation digging, framing, roofing and siding.

When both concrete mixer and pump trucks come in to pour a foundation, an already busy residential street full of construction vehicles can become a full-blown traffic circus. Note that some of these houses are finished and lived in, but the driveways and/or landscaping isn't finished yet. In case you're wondering, no, construction workers aren't allowed to block driveways of lived-in homes. This was taken in Castle Keep in Aspen Estates in April. Castle Keep, akin to its name, follows somewhat of a medieval-inspired architecture with these luxury houses' stone and stucco exteriors. There's a figure of a knight at the subdivision's entrance too.

When both concrete mixer and pump trucks come in to pour a foundation, an already busy residential street full of construction vehicles can become a full-blown traffic circus. Note that some of these houses are finished and lived in, but the driveways and/or landscaping may not be finished yet. In case you’re wondering, no, construction workers aren’t allowed to block driveways of lived-in homes. This was taken in Castle Keep in Aspen Estates in the southwest sometime in April. Castle Keep, akin to its name, follows somewhat of a medieval-inspired architecture with these luxury houses’ stone and stucco exteriors. There’s a figure of a knight at the subdivision’s entrance too.

Earth movers in action. This was taken around last month on the very northern edge of Evanston in the northwest. I'm not sure what's going to be built here, but my best guess is more houses.

Earth movers in action. This was taken around last month on the very northern edge of Evanston in the northwest. I’m not sure what’s going to be built here, but my best guess is, well, more houses.

OK, this one's not Calgary, but this street in Sunset Ridge in Cochrane I took today gives you a pretty good example of what a street that fairly close to completion looks like. The lived-in homes seem to outnumber the ones under construction. Not to mention the view and the perfect blue sky is spectacular.

OK, this one’s not Calgary, but this street in Sunset Ridge in Cochrane I took today gives you a pretty good example of what a street that’s fairly close to completion looks like. The lived-in homes seem to outnumber the ones under construction. Not to mention the view and the perfect blue sky is spectacular.

Aspen Estates, again, in this photo also taken today, as I stood on an empty lot. Note the rows of houses on the left and the earth movers on the right. Probably two more years and this photo would have a lot more houses in the frame.

Aspen Estates again in this photo, also taken today, as I stood on an empty lot. Note the rows of houses on the left, looking generally finished with completed siding, trees and everything. Then there’s the barren earth on the right. Probably two more years and this photo will have a lot more houses in the frame. Problem is if I came to this spot again in the future, a house on the lot I stood in would be blocking the view. Maybe the future resident will let me use his/her backyard for a moment?

Also see: Part 2 of this photo series.