Posts Tagged ‘packing’

threeframesIt was just like any other backyard summertime get-together in late July; barbecue on the go, beers in hand, buddies laughing and bonfire blazing.

With we Flugs being a family that never says no to a cheap or free firewood deal, sometimes people are bound to bring some over for us once in a while.

In this particular case though, what was brought to us that was intended for the fire pit turned out to be a little slice of Canadian food history.

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In this old apple box label, it looks like a Mrs. Suffsick from Sinaluta, Sask., at one point before I was born, seemed to really love Vernon, B.C. apples enough to custom order them. Stuff intended for firewood has a story, it seems.

On this old apple box label, it looks like a Mrs. Suffsick from Sinaluta, Sask., at one point before I was born, seemed to really love Vernon, B.C. apples enough to custom order them. Stuff intended for firewood has a story, it seems.

Needless to say, we couldn’t burn these.

These old apple labels that were donated to us by a family friend come from the early 20th century, starting from the World War I era going all the way until the 1960s when B.C.’s fruit was still packed and shipped in wooden boxes with all of these colourful labels, according to a former Kelowna Museums executive director quoted in this post from Good Fruit Grower.

There is even a postcard book of some of these labels.

This collection of about a dozen that fell into our hands doesn’t include any of the more eclectic artworks that are supposedly out there, like a Biblical image of a snake biting into a juicy, delicious apple (guess B.C. fruit’s just that tempting), but still a neat rescue nonetheless.

Three of them have since been given new life by my brother, who built solid oak frames around the labels and gave them a thick lacquer finish. It was a birthday present for my mother this fall.

mapleleafappleshoweapplesorchardLesson? When you’re donated firewood from someone that will help you huddle and keep warm this winter, look before chucking first.